Cotehele (St Dominick)

Cotehele (St Dominick)

Built in medieval times, the current house is mostly Tudor. Make your way through four floors of history to learn stories about the Edgcumbe family who owned it for 600 years. This fortified manor house is set on a high bluff on the Cornish bank of the river Tamar, which gave natural protection from skirmishing armies approaching from the east.

Inside the rambling stone walls you'll find a fascinating collection that reflects the antiquarian taste of the Georgian Edgcumbes. The family developed the interiors between about 1750 and 1860 in a deliberate attempt to evoke a sense of nostalgia and recreate the atmosphere of the 'good old days'.

Cotehele Garden And Orchards

Cotehele’s garden is relatively young in historical terms. It has developed since the sixteenth century and continues to vary and evolve each year. The garden is open every day from dawn to dusk. There’s something new in the garden for you to discover 365 days of the year. Spanning 14 acres plus 12 acres of orchard, it has variety far beyond the average garden on account of its terrain, rills and juxtaposition to the house.

The Old Orchard

The old orchard contains a variety of productive trees including apples, Tamar cherries, pears and walnuts. Autumn is a busy season when we harvest the apples. Although the lichen covered trees look old, many if not all are comparatively recent, having been planted since the 1960s. Despite the young age of the present trees, a 1731 map of Cotehele indicates that areas behind the house have been used for growing fruit trees for many years.

The Mother Orchard

We're busy in autumn harvesting apples here too. Apple collectors and propagators James Evans and Mary Martin inspired and informed the Mother Orchard. It was planted in 2007 and is part of a wider programme to trial West Country apple varieties. There are over 300 trees in the orchard representing some 120 different varieties of predominantly local origin.

The varieties grown here have been bred over the last 250 years to survive the mild and damp climatic conditions of the southwest peninsula. The intention of the current project is to provide a reference set of ‘mother trees’ that can be used for the selection of future varieties for both domestic and commercial use.

Contact

Telephone: 01208 265950

Email: lanhydrock@nationaltrust.org.uk