Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps

Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps

One of the county's more dramatic beaches. It gets it's name from the huge slate outcrops scattered along the beach and not the inordinate number of steps you need to go down to get to the beach. It is said that the outcrops were put there by Bedruthan, a giant, and used as stepping stones. At low tide the beach itself stretches for over a mile with plenty of interesting nooks and crannies.

As the numerous warning signs point out the cliffs are dangerous as are the tides and there is a good deal of potential to become cut off at high tide. Nearby are Carnewas cliffs owned by the National Trust with a cafe and toilets. Looking West from here you get a good view of Newquay bay.

A memorial plaque has been placed on the cliff top, dedicated to Alex Laurie from Derby, who drowned in the waters off Bedruthan Beach, in 1903. His friends, who were with him at the time, survived the incident and erected the plaque in his memory and as a warning to others.

Carnewas and Bedruthan became a popular tourist location during the Victorian era. As, nearby, Newquay grew in popularity as a holiday destination, more and more of the tourists began to make journey to Bedruthan - to see the dramatic coastal landscape. Local farmers responded to the opportunity and began to make an income from this growing trade - charging tolls for each horse that pulled the visitor's carriages to the site. It is thought that the local population embellished the experience by attributing the creation of this impressive landscape to 'Bedruthan,' a Cornish Giant, who used the stacks as stepping-stones across the bay.