St Keverne Parish Church

St Keverne Parish Church

The parish of St Keverne, (Cornish: Lannaghevran), is situated in the Deanery and Hundred of Kerrier; it is bounded on the north by Manaccan and St Anthony, on the east and south by the sea, and on the west by a detached part of Grade and by the parishes of Ruan Major and St Martins. The wild and spectacular coast of the parish of St Keverne is on the extreme southern coast of Cornwall. It is located on the Lizard Peninsular, and is on the south side of the Helford River. Geographically, it is the largest parish in Cornwall. The parish is a coastal one, mainly agricultural but with quarrying activity which is still active in 2001. There are three inhabited fishing coves in the parish: Porthallow, Porthousetock and Coverack.

The church spire was (and still is) a landmark for shipping for much of its existence. The parish includes the notorious Manacle Rocks (deriving its name from the old Cornish "Maen Eglos" - or Church Rocks) which has claimed many a ship because the rocks are submerged at high tide. The most famous ship lost was the SS Mohegan which was wrecked on the Manacles in 1898 with the loss of 106 lives.

The parish is mentioned in the Domesday Survey of 1086, as follows: The Canons of St Achebran's hold ST KEVERNE, and held it before 1066. 11 acres of land. Land for 7 ploughs; 1 plough there. Pasture, 20 acres. 8 cattle; 30 sheep. When the Count received it, value 40s;value now 5s.. In 1497, the Cornish rebellion, led by Michael Joseph An-Gof and Thomas Flamank, started their march on London from St Keverne. The event is marked by an inscription on the Church wall and a statue of the pair in the village.The Parish of St Keverne consists of the villages of St Keverne, Coverack, Porthallow, Porthoustock, and several hamlets including Traboe, Rosenithon, Ladden Vean, Tregowris and Ponsongath.